Ceiling Fan with higher rpm can throw less air. Longer Down Rod is one solution.

Down Rod is the rod connecting fan to the ceiling.  Length of this rod has been reduced by fan manufacturers.

Space between blades and ceiling is reduced.  With reduced space, less air available.

With less air available, fan blades pull less air.  Thus fan ventilates less air in the room.

 

What’s wrong?

Fan manufacturers increased the rotation per minute for the fans and reduced the length of down rod.

Such fans take more power, means electricity, and throw less air.

 

Refer Recommended Down Rod Length

Image

Source: http://g2art.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2013/05/downrod_chart.png

 

Line of action:

Refer the recommended down rod length needed for fan.

Check the ceiling height of the room. Check the down rod length.

In case, down rod length is less.  Call electrician for replacing down rod.

Length for new down rod should match to recommended down rod length.

Get better ventilation in the room.

 

Benefit:

This will help realize the full benefit from fan. In some cases, buying new AC may also be avoidable.

 

Recommended links:

 

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15 thoughts on “Ceiling Fan with higher rpm can throw less air. Longer Down Rod is one solution.

  1. Pingback: Ceiling Fan with higher rpm can throw less air. Longer Down Rod is one solution. | CareWare

  2. Very good information. We have a fan in our guest bedroom that is absolutely useless. We get practically no air circulation from it. Now I understand the dynamics that is responsible for that. Thanks again.

    Like

  3. We have been facing this issue in the dining-kitchen area and I’m glad I found this post, will definitely try the solution mentioned before contemplating an AC 🙂

    Like

  4. The reference diagram above the video is much different than the one in the video:
    Above diagram: (9′ ceiling = 12″ downrod)
    Video: (9′ ceiling = 6″ downrod).
    That’s quite a discrepancy.

    Also, the jump from 9′-10′ is very large. This makes it even more arbitrary when it’s in between sizes. I have a vaulted ceiling with the beam at 9’/4″ and the peak of the vault at 10’/5″

    Anyone care to explain the discrepancy and let me know what size I need?

    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • your query and quest looks genuine, i have added the diagram and video from different sources on in the internet; that is why it is different. I will see if I can get some standardization on it. will update you. regards

      Like

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